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‘Can Machines Copy’ comprises individually hand-drawn works of the same image. The work's title is derived from the first line of Alan Turning’s essay Computing Machinery and Intelligence; “I propose to consider the question, ‘Can machines think?’ This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms ‘machine’ and ‘think.’”1


Imperfection defines human production. However a mechanized reproduction is never flawless. Is a perceivable inaccuracy truer than an unperceivable inaccuracy?


‘Can Machines Copy’ considers human action as nothing more than a mechanized process.



1. Turing, A. M. “Computing Machinery and Intelligence.” Mind LIX.236 (1950): 433-60. Print.